Tag Archive: dennis quaid


I Can Only Imagine

Family Movie Night

By Karyn Bowman

Sometimes a good song falls in your lap. Sometimes a good song takes years to make. Sometimes it takes only minutes to write a song after a lifetime of experiences.

It is the story that drives I Can Only Imagine, a movie about the man who wrote the hit song on the Christian charts. It is both sad and sweet. It’s about redemption and taking chances.

The movie starts when Bart Millard is 10. He lives with his mother and father but the house is not happy. Alcoholic Dad takes his anger out on his family, causing Mom to up and leave. But not before she drops him off for a week at summer sleepover bible camp.

I can Only Imagine IMDbIt is here that Bart meets the love of his life, Shannon. They bond over camp activities and sneaking out to watch fireworks. But when Bart comes home, his mother has left and the only one at home is Bart’s father. A man who takes his anger out on his child.

So Bart spends the next few years trying to please his dad. But plans don’t always go the way you hope. Suddenly, Bart find himself in a different school club and a new door opens for him.

If you follow the band MercyMe, you might know the rest of the story. Of how a promoter saw the band, of how the band worked to be better, how they got an opportunity of a lifetime.

You might know the story on how Bart learned to forgive and open his heart. How his father made the biggest transformation of all.

It is a movie that surprised me because I enjoyed every bit of it. This is one of the few Christian movies where I feel like the writers and directors finally figured out that if you lean heavy on a good story, the message you want to share will come through.

I can only imagine BartIt helps that first time film-actor, J. Michael Finley, does an excellent job as the adult Bart. He makes the high school student and the adult vulnerable and closed off in the right parts. And yet, he cannot deny his own talent or his eagerness to use that talent.

Dennis Quaid gives us a character that is gruff and mean and unforgivable at the beginning. But in the end, we find ourselves rooting for the older man. Granted, he is only about five years older from the last time we see him but he is greatly changed. Quaid expresses all sides of this complicated man without going too far in one direction or another.

Trace Atkins also brings a special something to his role as the manager/promoter who gets the band noticed. His reluctance and belief in their potential makes the role feel real.

Sometimes sincere emotions can make up for lacks in this genre. Many of the people in this production came through with heart-felt portrayals that never let us down. Because of its uplifting story, because of the real transformation of the characters, I enjoyed watching this movie and would happily watch it again.

Until next week, see you in the rental aisle.

Family Movie Night

By Karyn Bowman

Many of you reading this column know that our family is a pet family.

Meaning that we have and had a variety of pets. Dogs stand out for us because they are right there, every day, beside us as we eat supper or take them for walks or give them food or watch TV or snack on anything that might fall on the floor.

Is there anything more cute – or pitiful – than a dog cocking their head just so in order to beg for a morsel of food?

A Dogs purposeSo this past weekend we watched A Dog’s Purpose with the knowledge that it could make us cry.

And we did cry – a lot. In fact, if you know you cry easily this may not be the movie for you. Context-wise, it is meant for adults although you could go as young as some pre-teens. But be aware you are going to have to do some explaining about pets who die, work dogs who die, and the general life span of a pet. There is no way you are getting through this movie with a younger child not wondering about their beloved pet. And they will cry about it.

The story is about the soul of a dog who travels through time to find he first true master.

We are not getting into the discussion of if animals have souls. In this movie, they do. And they laugh at some of their own antics. I have seen dogs give dirty looks, I have seen dogs smile, I have heard tales of a dog getting revenge on those who mistreat them.

But this dog, Bailey, starts off as the pet of a boy named Ethan. They are together through good times and bad times. That is until Bailey finally dies from old age after 12 wonderful years together.

Through the ether of the universe, Bailey comes back to be beloved by several more owners. He discovers his own love and he is mistreated. And then several years later, he finds Ethan again.

There are many actors who make this movie worth watching, starting with Dennis Quaid. As I searched through the cast list I found the names of people I knew as good reliable actors, such as Peggy Lipton, Britt Robertson, and Josh Gad. I learned about new actors, Kirby Howell-Baptiste, Pooch Hall, John Ortiz, and K. J. Apa, who made their roles interesting and compelling.

There is a book of the same name from which this book is based. I read that some portions of the movie are different than the book, which I couldn’t tell you because I haven’t read the book. But I found that this movie had great heart about why pets matter to us humans.

What I do know is that I loved watching this movie and I will probably re-watch it just as soon as I re-gain a healthy level in my my tissue supply.

Until next week, see you in the rental aisle.