Family Movie Night

By Karyn Bowman

Working in a library finds the staff always talking about books.

We talk about the ones we like, dislike, wouldn’t mind burning, and why we never will.

Banned Books picture

Banned and Challenged Books Image from a friend’s Facebook page

We talk with our patrons about the same thing as well as observations about various books. I remember one conversation in which the patron stated he read Mein Kampft. He read it to see what it was all about. And what he noted was if you could get past all of the hatred in the book, there was a solid economic plan for Germany in those days of incredible inflation.

Other times I have heard patrons talk about how they don’t like the language in some of their favorite authors changing to something a bit harsher, more vulgar. And the sexier novels are not always appreciated either.

Maybe they don’t like the sexuality that is dealing with something abusive or the violence of crime committed by serial killers.

There are a lot of reasons why people hate various books. But there are more reasons why we shouldn’t ban them.

Like it or not, we need these various ideas floating around so we can inspect them and see what works and what doesn’t. As much as I dislike the ideas floating around in the original black Sambo book, I believe we need to see it to remember what we don’t want to be. I have seen other versions of Sambo that are not so racially charged. In those books, Sambo is telling the same folktales and is not some caricature.

We celebrate Banned Book Week in libraries this week because we want to remind people that books shouldn’t be banned, ideas shouldn’t be hidden, people shouldn’t be silenced. And that includes the repugnant ones. Once you start banning books, ideas, people it never ends. There is never a line that stops it.

Did we not learn that from WWII and the Nazis? It started with Jews and worked it way to socialists, intelligentsia, journalists, unions, gypsies, religious groups, etc. There were at least 37 badges in various colors and dots or bars to designate your status in Nazi Germany..

The perks of being a wallflowerSo this week, take the time to watch a banned book turned into a movie. Maybe it is To Kill a Mockingbird starring Gregory Peck. Maybe it is The Perks of Being a Wallflower starring Emma Watson and Ezra Miller about two teens who bring a shy boy into their circle. Maybe it is Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone starring Daniel Radcliffe about a wizarding boy who survives an attack that brings him notoriety and danger.

There are many choices because there is no limit to what people seek to ban. That is if you’re so inclined for a banned book turned into a movie.

Until next week, see you in the rental aisle.

Advertisements